Antonyms for pass


Grammar : Noun, verb
Spell : pas, pahs
Phonetic Transcription : pæs, pɑs


Définition pass

Origin :
  • late 13c. (transitive) "to go by (something)," also "to cross over," from Old French passer (11c.), from Vulgar Latin *passare "to step, walk, pass" (cf. Spanish pasar, Italian passare), from Latin passus "step, pace" (see pace (n.)). Intransitive sense of "to go on, to move forward, make one's way" is attested from c.1300. Figurative sense of "to experience, undergo" (as in pass the time) is first recorded late 14c. Sense of "to go through an examination successfully" is from early 15c. Meaning "decline to do something" is attested from 1869, originally in cards (euchre). In football, hockey, soccer, etc., the meaning "to transfer the ball or puck to another player" is from c.1865. Related: Passed; passing.
  • The meaning "to be thought to be something one is not" (especially in racial sense) is from 1935, from pass oneself off (as), first found 1809. The general verb sense of "to be accepted as equivalent" is from 1590s. Pass up "decline, refuse" is attested from 1896. Pass the buck is from 1865, said to be poker slang reference to the buck horn-handled knife that was passed around to signify whose turn it was to deal. Pass the hat "seek contributions" is from 1762. Pass-fail as a grading method is attested from 1955, American English.
  • noun opening through solid
  • noun authorization, permission
  • noun sexual proposition
  • noun predicament
  • verb go by, elapse; move onward
  • verb surpass, beat
  • verb succeed, graduate
  • verb give, transfer
  • verb cease
  • verb enact, legislate
  • verb express formally
  • verb decide not to do
  • verb rid of waste
Example sentences :
  • If he said or did anything, there was no appeal; that was settled, let us pass to something else.
  • Extract from : « Malbone » by Thomas Wentworth Higginson
  • "Let that pass, sir," continued the stranger, with a bitter smile.
  • Extract from : « Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 327 » by Various
  • He will pass to the dark realm of nothingness, but will not find me there.
  • Extract from : « Monsieur du Muroir (From "Mosses From An Old Manse") » by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • Austin, being nearest the door, opened it for the ladies to pass out.
  • Extract from : « Viviette » by William J. Locke
  • It is difficult for me to fix positively the breadth of this Pass.
  • Extract from : « The Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains, Oregon and California » by Brevet Col. J.C. Fremont
  • They pass up the church-aisle, and raise their eyes to the ceiling.
  • Extract from : « The New Adam and Eve (From "Mosses From An Old Manse") » by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • Could this be all the obstruction I was prepared to open a pass through?
  • Extract from : « Journal of an Expedition into the Interior of Tropical Australia » by Thomas Mitchell
  • Height above the sea, of the Pass, 1458 feet;—of this camp, 1256 feet.
  • Extract from : « Journal of an Expedition into the Interior of Tropical Australia » by Thomas Mitchell
  • It was but a few steps, and she knew almost every house she had to pass.
  • Extract from : « Weighed and Wanting » by George MacDonald
  • That we pass out of this phase of being as we came into it, for Growth.
  • Extract from : « The Conquest of Fear » by Basil King

Synonyms for pass

Based on : Thesaurus.com - Gutenberg.org - Dictionary.com - Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019